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The Paradox of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction and Husserl’s Genealogy of the Mathematization of Nature

The Paradox of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction and Husserl’s Genealogy of the Mathematization of Nature cover image
The Paradox of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction and Husserl’s Genealogy of the Mathematization of Nature cover image The Paradox of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction and Husserl’s Genealogy of the Mathematization of Nature cover image
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by: Christoph Durt
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Publication Date: January 15, 2013
Book Size: 8.5" x 11"
Pages: 222
Binding: Perfect Bound
$20.00

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Book Synopsis
Since the time of Galileo, philosophers widely agree on a distinction that has been known since Locke as the distinction between “primary” and “secondary” qualities. In spite of claiming that experiences or ideas of secondary qualities must be produced by configurations and movements of particles constituted of primary qualities, philosophers such as Descartes and Locke also claim that the connection between primary qualities and ideas of secondary qualities is inconceivable. The combination of the two claims I call the “paradox of the primary-secondary quality distinction.” The philosophical disputes around the distinction usually ignore the paradox, and instead circle around different types of explanations of secondary qualities in terms of primary qualities: projectivism, eliminativism, physicalism, and dispositionalism. These contradict each other ontologically, but nevertheless they share a common origin: the view that the world is mathematical in itself.
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