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The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell's Fort and Martin's Station

The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell
The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell
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by: Russell Mahan
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Publication Date: June 11, 2020
Book Size: 6" x 9"
Pages: 173
Binding: Perfect Bound
Color: Black and White
$19.57

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Book Synopsis
The Kentucky Kidnappings and Death March: The Revolutionary War at Ruddell's Fort and Martin's Station. In 1780, during the Revolutionary War, Kentucky was invaded by 200 British and Canadian soldiers and 800 Native American warriors. They surrounded and compelled to surrender two small American settlements called Ruddell’s Fort and Martin’s Station. The people there were simply farmers with families.

At Ruddell’s Fort British Captain Henry Bird promised that settlers would be protected from the Indians and remain in the custody of the English. As soon as the gates opened in surrender, the Indians rushed in, killing some settlers and brutally seizing the rest as slaves, adoptees and prisoners. Every man, woman and child was claimed.

All of the families from Ruddell’s Fort and Martin’s Station, amounting to about 400 people, were kidnapped by the British and Indians and forced on a 500-mile death march to the British stronghold at Fort Detroit.Short on food and driven at a relentless pace, the prisoners endured a reign of terror the entire journey. Family members were separated, not knowing what became of each other. Young and old who slowed the column were killed. Babies were thrown into the fire and to the wayside. Women drowned and were tomahawked. Shocked and dazed by the experience, the American settlers were held as prisoners of war for two and a half years. They were finally welcomed home by General George Washington at army headquarters in Newburgh, New York.

This true story is told through the experience of the Mahan family, which traveled the Wilderness Road from Virginia to Martin’s Station in an optimistic search for a new life. Instead they found death and imprisonment. All known names of the captives are listed in the book.
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