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Methods in Modeling Ion-Exchange Selectivity, Volume 1. Detecting Binary Interactions in Ternary Ion Exchange Data

Methods in Modeling Ion-Exchange Selectivity, Volume 1. Detecting Binary Interactions in Ternary Ion Exchange Data cover image
Methods in Modeling Ion-Exchange Selectivity, Volume 1. Detecting Binary Interactions in Ternary Ion Exchange Data cover image Methods in Modeling Ion-Exchange Selectivity, Volume 1. Detecting Binary Interactions in Ternary Ion Exchange Data cover image Methods in Modeling Ion-Exchange Selectivity, Volume 1. Detecting Binary Interactions in Ternary Ion Exchange Data cover image
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by: Jacob G. Reynolds
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Publication Date: May 3, 2014
Book Size: 8.5" x 11"
Pages: 27
Binding: Perfect Bound
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Book Synopsis
Many modelers of ion-exchange thermodynamics have assumed that the selectivity of two ions within a ternary system could be modeled from data gained from the associated binary systems. The heart of this assumption is that the third ion has no synergistic interactions with the other ions in the solid phase, but rather influences the exchange solely by diluting the concentration of other ions on the solid. Here, a method to detect synergism between solid-phase ions is reported. The method developed employs Log Contrast models and the statistical F Test. The Log Contrast models use mole ratios rather than mole fractions as inputs because mole ratios are not subject to the mixture constraint. The Log Contrast models are fit to Vanselow selectivity coefficient (Kv) versus solid-phase mole fraction data, with or without the third ion in the model (but with the third ion on the exchanger). If the model fit is statistically significantly better with the third ion in the model than withou
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About The Author
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Jacob G. Reynolds has a B.S. in Chemistry from Evergreen State College and M.S. in Soil Chemistry from the University of Idaho. He has 15 years experience in modeling chemical systems, including: soils, glass melters, off-gas treatment equipment, solid-liquid phase equilibrium, and ion exchange. Much of this work involved developing practical models that could be put inside efficient software tools, while maintaining statistical significance and underlying physical understanding. He has written more than 30 papers for reviewed journals or conference proceedings. Jacob is currently a process engineering manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, at the Hanford nuclear reservation.